Hessler X110A. Act of July 22, 1846. $50 Interest Bearing Note. PCGS Currency Choice About New 58. R

Hessler

15000 - 25000
Friedberg 242 (W-362). 1886 $2  Silver Certificate. PCGS Currency Superb Gem New 67 PPQ.

Friedbe

5000 - 7000
Friedberg 246 (W-366). 1891 $2  Silver Certificate. PCGS Currency Superb Gem New 68 PPQ.

Friedbe

15000 - 25000
Friedberg 263 (W-794). 1886 $5  Silver Certificate. PCGS Currency Very Choice New 64 PPQ.

Friedbe

6000 - 8000
Friedberg 290 (W-1493). 1880 $10 Silver Certificate of Deposit. PCGS Currency Very Choice New 64.

Friedbe

100000 - 150000
Friedberg 291 (W-1494). 1886 $10  Silver Certificate. PCGS Currency Gem New 65 PPQ.

Friedbe

30000 - 50000
Friedberg Unlisted (W-Unlisted). 1897 $10 Silver Certificate. PCGS Currency Very Choice New 64 PPQ.

Friedbe

20000 - 30000
Friedberg 312 (W-2173). 1880 $20  Silver Certificate of Deposit. PCGS Currency About New 50 PPQ.

Friedbe

30000 - 40000
Friedberg 320 (W-2181). 1891 $20  Silver Certificate. PMG Gem Uncirculated 66 EPQ.

Friedbe

20000 - 30000
Friedberg 328 (W-2928). 1880 $50  Silver Certificate of Deposit. PCGS Currency Choice About New 55 P

Friedbe

100000 - 150000
Friedberg 329 (W-2929). 1880 $50  Silver Certificate of Deposit. PCGS Currency About New 53 PPQ.

Friedbe

75000 - 125000
Friedberg 341 (W-3623). 1880 $100  Silver Certificate of Deposit. PCGS Currency About New 53.

Friedbe

125000 - 175000
Friedberg 342 (W-3624). 1880 $100  Silver Certificate of Deposit. PCGS Currency Extremely Fine 45.

Friedbe

75000 - 125000
1891年1000美元银券马西山  PCGS Currency Very Fine 25

1891年10

2000000 - 3000000
Friedberg 838b (W-830-F-b). 1914 Red Seal $5  Federal Reserve Note. PCGS Currency Superb Gem New 67

Friedbe

4000 - 6000
Friedberg 212 (W-2680). 1864 $50  Interest Bearing Note. PCGS Currency Very Fine 20.

Friedbe

100000 - 150000
Friedberg 210 (W-4410). 1861 $1,000  Interest Bearing Note. PCGS Currency Choice About New 58. Proof

Friedbe

10000 - 15000
Friedberg 202c (W-3920). 1861 Proof $500  Interest Bearing Note. PCGS Currency Choice New 63. Face P

Friedbe

25000 - 35000
Friedberg 199 (W-3245). 1863 $100  Interest Bearing Note. PCGS Currency Very Fine 30.

Friedbe

125000 - 175000
Friedberg195c. 1861 $100 Interest Bearing Note. PCGS Currency Very Choice New 64. Proof.

Friedbe

3000 - 5000
Friedberg 192b (W-2740). 1864 $50  Compound Interest Treasury Note. PCGS Currency Very Fine 30.

Friedbe

70000 - 100000
1869年1000美元彩虹 PCGS Currency 53

1869年10

1500000 - 2500000
1869年500美元彩虹 PCGS Currency 55 PPQ

1869年50

1500000 - 2500000
Friedberg 168 (W-3480). 1869 $100  Legal Tender Note. PCGS Currency Gem New 66 PPQ.

Friedbe

300000 - 500000
Friedberg 161 (W-2810). 1880 $50  Legal Tender Note. PCGS Currency Superb Gem New 67 PPQ.

Friedbe

27500 - 37500
1869年50美元  PCGS Currency 64PPQ

1869年50

300000 - 500000
Friedberg 127 (W-2000). 1869 $20  Legal Tender Note. PCGS Currency Superb Gem New 67 PPQ.

Friedbe

100000 - 150000
Friedberg 123 (W-1303). 1923 $10  Legal Tender Note. PCGS Currency Superb Gem New 67 PPQ.

Friedbe

20000 - 30000
Friedberg 96 (W-1275). 1869 $10  Legal Tender Note. PCGS Currency Gem New 66 PPQ.

Friedbe

12500 - 17500
Friedberg 85 (W-671). 1907 $5  Legal Tender Note. PCGS Currency Superb Gem New 68 PPQ.

Friedbe

6000 - 8000

Lot:4023  Friedberg 212a (W-3280). 1864 $100 Interest Bearing Note. PCGS Currency Very Fine 30.

进入专场

拍品分类 世界钱币 品相
拍品估价 USD 125000 - 175000 成交价 USD 1560
拍卖专场 SBP2019年2月巴尔地摩#5-Joel集藏 拍卖公司 SBP
开拍日期 2019-03-01 06:00:00 结标日期 2019-03-01 07:00:00 拍卖状态 成交
拍品描述 Friedberg 212a (W-3280). 1864 $100 Interest Bearing Note. PCGS Currency Very Fine 30.This impressive $100 Interest Bearing Note is one of just four examples known for the catalog number. It bears an engraved issue date of August 15, 1864 and displays Lieutenant General Winfield Scott at the center of the note. Black die counters with 100 overlapping Roman numeral Cs are at upper left and right. Green Roman numeral Cs are at upper right and left of center and green 100 die counters are to the bottom left and right. A small red spiked Treasury Seal is to the right. The engraved signatures of Colby and Spinner are seen at bottom left and right respectively. These notes bore 7.3% interest and were payable semi-annually in "lawful money." Buyers were banks and other investors. These notes never passed hand to hand in general circulation. This particular example has the "promise to pay" filled in with "Secretary of the Treasury for redemption."pThe back is printed in green with large Roman numeral C counters at left and right. Language on the back, right of center, explains that the notes could be converted to bonds any time after five years, payable 20 years from August 15, 1867 with six percent interest per annum. This example is bright and evenly circulated with ample margins. The printed inks are bold with vibrant green protector inks as well.pAll four examples of the catalog number are privately held. This note, with serial number 213729, is the finest graded example of the four. It is the plate note seen on page 629 of the emWhitman Encyclopedia of U.S. Paper Money/em by Q. David Bowers. This note last appeared in auction in 2005 where it realized $97,750. The market for "Middle of the Book" rarities such as this is more developed now and we certainly expect to see a price realization well into the six figures once the gavel comes down.strongFurther Numismatic Commentary for 1864/strongpIn 1864, the last full year of the Civil War, the value of Legal Tender Notes went from bad to worse, and on July 11, a $10 paper note was worth just $3.90 in silver coins. In the Confederacy, a $10 note was worth just 46¢ in coin. The Act of April 22, 1864 discontinued the copper-nickel alloy for cents, and authorized mintage of cents and two-cent pieces in "French bronze," an alloy continued in use (for cents) through much of the first half of the twentieth century. The same legislation prohibited the private issuance of tokens to circulate as money. This bothered the issuers not in the slightest, and various minters continued to turn out millions of tokens dated 1864!ppIn this year two-cent coins were the first to circulate with IN GOD WE TRUST; this motto appeared on silver denominations, 25¢ and up, gold $5 and up, beginning in 1866. Cents struck later in 1864 bore engraver James B. Longacres initial L on the bonnet ribbon; the gold dollar had shown the L since 1849, while the $3 and $20 displayed JBL on the neck truncation from the beginning of these denominations. Philadelphia mintages of most silver and gold denominations remained low for much the same reasons as in 1863. At the Philadelphia Mint the wholesale restriking of old rarities and the creation of new patterns continued apace, as it had since the spring of 1859. This was a very secret operation conducted by Mint officials with no records kept. This illegal action proved to be a boon for a later generation of numismatists; at least 90% of the patterns and restrikes avidly sought by collectors today were made during that period, until a change of directorship in the summer of 1885.ppCoin auctions, mostly held in New York City, were dynamic with many bidders. Buyers had to pay in coin or, if in paper money, a larger sum than invoice to adjust for the depreciation of the bills. Bankers Magazine, June 1864, gave a report that included this:ppem"Coin Sales in New York. At a recent sale of coins by Bangs, Merwin & Co. of this city, a United States cent of the year 1793 brought $30. Another of the same date, but of a different variety, brought $16. A cent of 1796, with the cap of Liberty behind the head, was sold for $15-a very large price, when it is considered that the specimen sold was by no means what collectors call "Uncirculated." A cent of 1804, described as a "splendid impression," was knocked down at $26. One of the next year, 1805, brought $13, and one of 1811 the astonishingly high price of $25. A half cent of 1793 brought $16.50. A coin or token, struck in England in 1694 for the "Carolinas" in North America, bearing a representation of an elephant on one side, and the words "God preserve Carolina and the Lords Proprietors" on the other, was sold for $41. A similar piece, struck at a later period, for the British settlement in Kentucky, brought the extraordinary sum of $105. This token was in silver, but it is said, that a specimen in copper, equally fine, would have brought the same price."/emppFrom Currency Auctions of Americas sale of September 1997, lot 1424; Heritage/CAAs sale of February 2005, lot 16761.