1787 New York Excelsior copper. New York State Arms, Heraldic Eagle, Eagle to left. Breen-980, W-578

1787 Ne

30000
1787 New York Excelsior copper. Standing Indian, New York Arms. Breen-990, W-5795. AU-53 (PCGS).

1787 Ne

55000
1787 New York Excelsior copper. Standing Indian, Eagle on Globe. Breen-991, W-5800. F-12 (PCGS).

1787 Ne

20000
1787 Nova Eborac copper. W-5755. Medium Bust, Seated Figure Left. AU-55 (PCGS).

1787 No

3600
1787 Nova Eborac copper. W-5760. Medium Bust, Seated Figure Right. AU-53 (PCGS).

1787 No

5000
1786 New Jersey Immunis Columbia. Shield Reverse. Maris 3-C, W-5670. Rarity-6+. MS-63 BN (PCGS).

1786 Ne

85000
1787 New Jersey copper. Maris 6-C, W-5040. Rarity-5-. Pattern Shield. MS-63 BN (PCGS).

1787 Ne

30000
1786 New Jersey copper. Maris 21-P, W-4920. Rarity-5. MS-64 BN (PCGS).

1786 Ne

25000
1788 New Jersey copper. Maris 75-bb, W-5520. Rarity-4. Running Fox. AU-50 (PCGS).

1788 Ne

5000
1785 Vermont copper. Ryder-1, W-2250. Rarity-5. IMMUNE COLUMBIA. EF-40 (PCGS).

1785 Ve

30000
1786 Vermont copper. Landscape. Ryder-6, W-2020. Rarity-3. VERMONTENSIUM. MS-63+ BN (PCGS).

1786 Ve

35000
1786 Vermont copper. Landscape. Ryder-6, W-2020. Rarity-3. VERMONTENSIUM. EF-45 (PCGS).

1786 Ve

5000
1786 Vermont copper. Ryder-9, W-2040. Rarity-3. Baby Head. VF Detail, Scratch (PCGS).

1786 Ve

4000
1788 Vermont copper. Ryder-27, W-2205. Rarity-3. Mailed Bust Right. EF-45 (PCGS).

1788 Ve

1750
Undated (ca. 1785) Bar copper. W-8520 MS-63 BN (PCGS).

Undated

30000
1786 Non Vi Virtute Vici copper. Breen-977, Musante GW-7, Baker-13, W-5730. Small Head. VF Detail—To

1786 No

20000
1787 (ca. 1860s?) Brasher Doubloon electrotype. EB on Wing. Copper shells over lead.

1787 (c

2000
1788 Connecticut copper. Miller 16.3-N, W-4610. Rarity-2. Draped Bust Left. AU-53 (PCGS).

1788 Co

700
1788 Connecticut copper. Miller 2-D, W-4405. Rarity-2. Mailed Bust Right. MS-62 BN (PCGS).

1788 Co

2500
1787 Connecticut copper. Miller 43.1-Y, W-4250. Rarity-2. Draped Bust Left. MS-62 BN (PCGS).

1787 Co

5000
1787 Connecticut copper. Miller 37.3-i, W-4110. Rarity-3. Draped Bust Left. MS-61 BN (PCGS).

1787 Co

500
1787 Connecticut copper. Miller 33.36-T.2, W-3900. Rarity-2. Draped Bust Left. MS-62 BN (PCGS).

1787 Co

3000
1787 Connecticut copper. Miller 11.2-K, W-2875. Rarity-2. Mailed Bust Left. AU-58+ (PCGS).

1787 Co

15000
1787 Connecticut copper. Miller 4-L, W-2810. Rarity-1. Horned Bust. AU Detail, Environmental Damage

1787 Co

500
1787 Connecticut copper. Miller 1.2-C, W-2720. Rarity-3. Muttonhead. AU-58+ (PCGS).

1787 Co

5000
1787 Connecticut copper. Miller 1.1-A, W-2700. Rarity-3. Small Head. AU-58 (PCGS).

1787 Co

8000
1786 Connecticut copper. Miller 5.4-O.1, W-2590. Rarity-2. Mailed Bust Left. AU-53 (PCGS).

1786 Co

1000
1785 Connecticut copper. Miller 4.1-F.4, W-2355. Rarity-1. Mailed Bust Right. African Head. EF-40 (P

1785 Co

1500
1785 Connecticut copper. Miller 3.4-F.2, W-2345. Rarity-2. Mailed Bust Right. EF-45 (PCGS).

1785 Co

1500
1785 Connecticut copper. Miller 3.3-F.3, W-2335. Rarity-4. Mailed Bust Right. AU-58 (PCGS).

1785 Co

5000

Lot:7088  1787纽约乔治像铜币 PCGS MS 62

进入专场

拍品分类 世界钱币 品相 PCGS MS62
拍品估价 USD 250000 成交价 USD 168000
拍卖专场 SBP2018年10月巴尔地摩-美国钱币The Archangel#8 拍卖公司 SBP
开拍日期 2018-10-27 06:30:00 结标日期 2018-10-27 09:30:00 拍卖状态 成交
拍品描述 1787纽约乔治像铜币 PCGS MS 62

1787 New York George Clinton copper. W-5790. MS-62 BN (PCGS).158.8 grains. One of the most distinctive of the Confederation-era coppers, the George Clinton copper always attracts attention when offered. This specimen is both finer and more distinctive than most, with a glossy and beautiful deep olive patina that resembles the most desirable Roman bronzes. Aside from an area of thin patina on the high point of Clinton’s jawline, the surfaces exhibit exceptionally even and particularly beautiful color, a shade and quality that would be delightful if applied and even more fortuitous when found naturally, as here. The obverse is aligned to 2:00, with the die edge visible from 6:00 to 9:00. The reverse is shifted a bit to 6:00 and shows the beaded border and an unstruck area above it atop that side. The devices are crisp and boldly detailed, and no significant post-striking flaws or damage are seen on either side. A few parallel lines between Clinton’s cheek and jaw are ancient, trivial, and barely visible. This coin’s special eye appeal matches its exceptional sharpness.<p>This example, then the property of William Sumner Appleton, was one of just two examples of this charismatic rarity known to Sylvester S. Crosby when he penned <em>The Early Coins of America</em>. The other specimen known to Crosby was the Parmelee coin, last sold in the May 2014 Newman sale for $499,375 and the only privately held specimen finer than this one. Over the years, just over a dozen examples have emerged, and excitement follows whenever they appear on the market. The last specimen we offered was the Kendall coin, earlier from James Ten Eyck and Garrett, a PCGS EF-40 that brought $235,000. That example was struck over a 1787 Immune Columbia copper, a venture contemporary to this one that shares date punches and backstory. Of the 12 known, at least five are impounded: two in the British Museum, one in the National Numismatic Collection of the Smithsonian Institution, and the Lasser specimen at Colonial Williamsburg. Lasser’s coin was acquired at the legendary 2000 U.S. Marshals sale and taken off the market permanently. At least a few are well worn, like the F-15 (PCGS) Royce coin from our November 2012 sale and the VF-20 (PCGS) specimen sold by Heritage in August 2014. <p>As New York considered its copper coinage in 1787, assessing the number of low grade counterfeit halfpence in circulation and examining the possibility of producing its own coppers, George Clinton was the state’s popular and high-profile governor. While not an official issue of the state of New York, this piece appears to have been struck as a trial in the hopes of landing a coining contract, or at least being allowed to operate a private mint legally. While New York never joined the likes of Massachusetts, Connecticut, Vermont, or New Jersey, the pattern issues struck during the first months of 1787 are among the most evocative and widely desired rarities of their era. The George Clinton copper has always maintained a primacy among them, rare and distinctive, with a collectible population that barely exceeds the fingers on one hand. This piece is among the best of them and stands as the finest certified by PCGS.PCGS Population: 1, none finer.From the Archangel Collection. Earlier, from Stack’s sale of May 1975, lot 463; the William Sumner Appleton Collection, to the collection of the Massachusetts Historical Society by bequest in 1905; Stack’s sale of March 1973, lot 31.