1865 (Post-1886) Abraham Lincoln Presidential Medal. Bronzed Copper. 77 mm. By George T. Morgan. Jul

1865 (P

500
1865 (Post-1886) Abraham Lincoln Presidential Medal. Bronzed Copper. 77 mm. By George. T. Morgan. Ju

1865 (P

500
1873 Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Medal. Bronzed Copper. 75.8 millimeters. By William and Charles E

1873 Ul

500
1964 Barry Goldwater for President Medal. Gold. 39 mm. 41.55 grams. 22 karat. Prooflike Mint State.

1964 Ba

1750
Undated Anti-Bryan Dollar. Tinned Steel. 26.1 mm. Schornstein-910, Zerbe-136. Extremely Fine.

Undated

500
Undated Bryan Dollar. Brass. 93.3 mm. Schornstein-Unlisted, Zerbe-Unlisted. Extremely Fine.

Undated

500
1877 Armory Seventh Regiment Medal. White Metal. 40 mm. MS-64 DPL (NGC).

1877 Ar

500
1897 Grant Monument Medal. Bronze. 63.5 mm. By Tiffany & Co. Miller-11. Mint State.

1897 Gr

500
1903 Amerigo Vespucci Plaque. Silver. 76.2 mm x 57.8 mm. 121.4 grams. By Victor D. Brenner. Miller-1

1903 Am

800
1905 John Paul Jones Plaque. Silver. 80 mm x 60 mm. By Victor David Brenner. Miller-16, Smedley-128,

1905 Jo

750
1905 John Paul Jones Plaque. Silver. 80 mm x 60 mm. By Victor David Brenner. Miller-16, Smedley-128,

1905 Jo

500
1905 John Paul Jones Plaque. Bronze. 80 mm x 60 mm. By Victor David Brenner. Miller-16, Smedley-128,

1905 Jo

500
1983 American Numismatic Society 125th Anniversary Medal. Silver. 109.0 mm x 90.7 mm. 513.13 grams.

1983 Am

1000
1907 Assay Commission Medal. Silver. 39.3 mm x 55.3 mm. 61.2 grams. By Charles E. Barber and George

1907 As

1500
1836 First Steam Coinage. Original Feb. 22 Date. Copper. 28 mm. By Christian Gobrecht. Julian MT-20.

1836 Fi

1800
1861 Abraham Lincoln Civil War Soldier Identification Disc. Copper. 30 mm. By F. B. SMITH. Cunningha

1861 Ab

350
Demi-Bust of George Washington. Chalkware or Ceramic. Approximately 12.5 inches by 7.5 inches, inclu

Demi-Bu

500
1891 George Washington Monument Dedication Medal. Bronze. 38 mm. Baker N-324, HK-763. MS-65 BN (PCGS

1891 Ge

400
1889 Inaugural Centennial Badge by Saint-Gaudens. Silver. 35 mm. Musante GW-1136, Douglas-54. AU-50

1889 In

750
1789 (ca. 1889) Seal of New York City Medal. First Obverse. Bronze. 35 mm. Musante GW-1126, Baker-67

1789 (c

500
1878 Valley Forge Centennial Medal. Bronze. 41 mm. Musante GW-959, Baker-449A, HK-137. MS-65 (PCGS).

1878 Va

500
(ca. 1875) Fredericksburg Lodge Medal. Second Obverse. Brass. 29 mm. Musante GW-840, Baker-297B. MS-

(ca. 18

500
1799 (ca. 1864) Washington - General of the American Armies Medalet. Silver. 19 mm. Musante GW-748,

1799 (c

400
1799 (ca. 1862) Equestrian Washington / Born, Died Medal. Copper. 29 mm. Musante GW-547, Baker-158A.

1799 (c

400
1799 (ca. 1863) George Hampden Lovetts Third Series of Washington Medals. Fourth Washington Obverse

1799 (c

400
1799 (ca. 1862) George Hampden Lovetts Series Medal. Second Obverse / Born, Died Reverse. Copper. 29

1799 (c

300
1799 (ca. 1863) New York Statue / Liberty Cap Mule. Copper. 29 mm. By George Hampden Lovett. Musante

1799 (c

400
Undated (ca. 1863) New York Statue / Tomb at Mt. Vernon Mule. Copper. 29 mm. By George Hampden Lovet

Undated

350
1799 (ca. 1863) George Hampden Lovetts Second Series of Washington Medals. Tomb at Mt. Vernon / U.S.

1799 (c

500
1799 (ca. 1863) Tomb at Mt. Vernon / U.S. Shield Mule. Copper. 29 mm. Musante GW-520, Baker-124M. MS

1799 (c

400

Lot:103  1801托马斯杰斐逊奖章 PCGS SP 61

进入专场

拍品分类 世界钱币>银币 品相 PCGS SP61
拍品估价 USD 40000 成交价 USD 0
拍卖专场 SBP2018年10月巴尔地摩-美国钱币#1 拍卖公司 SBP
开拍日期 2018-10-25 04:00:00 结标日期 2018-10-25 09:00:00 拍卖状态 预展
拍品描述 1801托马斯杰斐逊奖章 PCGS SP 61

1801 Thomas Jefferson Inaugural Medal. Julian PR-2. Silver. 45 mm. Specimen-61 (PCGS).

One of the most significant medallic offerings in this sale, this is a simply outstanding example of this historic and rare early U.S. Mint medal. Smartly impressed from the dies, both sides exhibit full definition that even extends to the highest points of Jeffersons portrait.

The finish is satiny throughout with modest semi-reflective tendencies evident in the fields at direct lighting angles. Wispy hairlines are a bit more prevalent on the reverse, both sides with a few scattered marks that include a shallow rim bruise at 4 oclock on the reverse. The overall appearance is quite smooth in hand, however, and the eye appeal further benefits from lovely iridescent toning in pearl gray and silver-lilac.

A beautiful example of the type, and one of perhaps a dozen or so known in silver. This medal, the first Presidential medal struck at the nascent Philadelphia Mint, was produced in republican ardor by Henry Voigt, one of Jeffersons biggest fans. Its history is detailed in the following excerpt from an article by our own John Kraljevich that appeared in the July 2009 issue of <em style="font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;orphans:2;text-align:start;widows:2;-webkit-text-stroke-width:0px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial;word-The Numismatist No one was ever more aware of his own relationship to the meaning of July 4th than Jefferson.

The day defined him, ever since, as a 33 year old, he worked for weeks during a sweltering Philadelphia summer to compose what became the Declaration of Independence. One of Jeffersons last letters, penned just a week before his death, sums up his attitude toward July 4th and how that day has been remembered by his contemporaries:</em><p><em>May it be to the world, what I believe it will be, (to some parts sooner, to others later, but finally to all,) the signal of arousing men to burst the chains under which monkish ignorance and superstition had persuaded them to bind themselves, and to assume the blessings and security of self-government. That form which we have substituted, restores the free right to the unbounded exercise of reason and freedom of opinion. All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately, by the grace of God. These are grounds of hope for others. For ourselves, let the annual return of this day forever refresh our recollections of these rights, and an undiminished devotion to them.</em><p><em>Jefferson was not exactly bashful about his role in the authorship of the Declaration, indeed, he was disappointed any editing was made by the Committee of Five rather than leaving his work stand unchanged. It is perhaps unsurprising that Jefferson, a noted medal collector and fan of the genre, would happily support the first ever medal dedicated specifically to commemorate the Declarations adoption of July 4.</em><p><em>It was Henry Voigts idea. Then working as the Mints chief coiner, Voigt wrote to President Jefferson in December 1801 that "the citizens of Philadelphia, friends to our government and your administration have often expressed a desire of seeing a medallion struck to commemorate the declaration of independence and the past triumph of republicanism on the 4th March 1801." The latter date, of course, was the day of Jeffersons election, the end of the so-called "Revolution of 1800," by which power gracefully passed between opponents for the first time in human history. Voigts motivation, aside from flattering the President to whom he was quite dedicated, was to find employment for "a German artist of superior talents." Voigt had personally taken over the indenture of John Reich and was thus charged with his care. A valuable medal commission would be the ideal way to launch his career.</em><p><em>Voigt took the liberty of allowing Reich to create the medal and strike it on dies at the mint in Philadelphia without asking for Jeffersons permission. Reich had already created a medallic portrait of Jefferson, as the ailing Robert Scot subcontracted work on Jeffersons Indian Peace medal to the young German. "The fault [the portrait] may have as to likeness or character," Voigt told Jefferson, "the artist may be excused for, since he never had the pleasure of seeing the original." The reverse of the medal depicted, according to Voigt, the goddess Minerva ... to represent Liberty as well as wisdom. She holds the declaration of independence and lays it on a rock, representing the Constitution. It was the first time the Declaration had ever been graphically illustrated on a coin or medal. The exergual legend made the intent plain: TO COMMEMORATE JULY 4 1776.</em><p><em>Jefferson took to the idea. He wrote to Voigt the day after he received his letter, saying "the Declaration of Independence is certainly an epoch of ours being so remarkable as to merit a medal." Jefferson requested more medals, in addition to the one he was sent as a gift, "with information of the prices which I will immediately have paid."

He sent specimens to both his daughters as well as his daughter Marias mother-in-law, among other friends. Both daughters, accustomed to being away from their father, sent thank you notes. Martha wrote that "as I found fault with Houdon for making you too old I shall have the same quarrel with this medal also. You have many years to live before it can be a perfect one." Marias letter is heart-rending: "Mine will be very precious to me, dear Papa, during the long separation from you to which I am doomed." Marias medal was last seen in 1973, when it was stolen from the University of Virginia. It has not been recovered.

Jeffersons death on July 4, 1826 was as dramatic an ending as any American patriot ever had, with the possible exception of his long-time friend (and sometime enemy) John Adams. Adams died the same day. His last words were said to have been "Jefferson still lives." In fact, he did not; he had died hours earlier

Jefferson once wrote to Adams that "the flames kindled on the 4th of July 1776 have spread over too much of the globe to be extinguished by the feeble engines of despotism." They would both be heartened to know that, a score of decades and scores of despots later, the day they both idealized remained a day of celebration and thanksgiving. </em><em></em><p>There are likely fewer than 25 Jefferson Inaugural medals extant in silver and white metal, fewer than half of which are the former composition. They were never restruck or made in an inexpensive modern bronze format. Examples are offered rarely, with years occasionally passing between auction appearances. Ranked #26 in the book <em style="font-variant-ligatures:normal;font-variant-caps:normal;orphans:2;text-align:start;widows:2;-webkit-text-stroke-width:0px;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial;word-spacing:0px;">The 100 Greatest American Medals and Tokens</em>.