1870 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-2. Rarity-3-. Doubled Die Reverse. MS-62 (NGC).

1870 Li

2000
1870 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-3. Rarity-2. Doubled Die Reverse. MS-61 (PCGS).

1870 Li

2000
1870 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-6. Rarity-2. MS-61 (PCGS).

1870 Li

1800
1871 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-5. Rarity-2. EF-45 (PCGS).

1871 Li

350
1871 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-13. Rarity-2. MS-64+ (PCGS).

1871 Li

8000
1872 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-3. Rarity-1. Misplaced Date, Doubled Die Reverse. AU-55 (PCGS)

1872 Li

1000
1872-CC Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-1. Rarity-3+. Fine-12 (PCGS).

1872-CC

2750
1872-S Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-1, the only known dies. Rarity-3-. AU-50 (PCGS).

1872-S

2000
1878 Morgan Silver Dollar. 7/8 Tailfeathers. Strong. MS-65 (PCGS). CAC.

1878 Mo

1800
1878 Morgan Silver Dollar. 7/8 Tailfeathers. Strong. MS-65 (PCGS).

1878 Mo

1100
1878 Morgan Silver Dollar. 7/8 Tailfeathers. VAM-37. Strong, 7/4 Tailfeathers. MS-65 (PCGS).

1878 Mo

1100
1878 Morgan Silver Dollar. 7 Tailfeathers. Reverse of 1878. Proof-63 (PCGS).

1878 Mo

3750
1878 Morgan Silver Dollar. 7 Tailfeathers. Reverse of 1878. MS-66 PL (PCGS).

1878 Mo

7000
1878 Morgan Silver Dollar. 7 Tailfeathers. Reverse of 1878. MS-66 (NGC).

1878 Mo

2500
1878-CC Morgan Silver Dollar. MS-66 (PCGS).

1878-CC

3500
1868 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-5. Rarity-3-. AU-58 (PCGS).

1868 Li

1800
1867 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. Proof-65 (PCGS).

1867 Li

6500
1866 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-1. Rarity-2. Repunched Date, Doubled Die Reverse. MS-61 (NGC).

1866 Li

2000
1865 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-4. Rarity-4+. Bar 6. MS-63 (PCGS).

1865 Li

7000
1865 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-2. Rarity-2. VF-35 (PCGS).

1865 Li

1200
1865 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-2. Rarity-2. EF-40 (PCGS).

1865 Li

1700
1865 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-2. Rarity-2. EF-45 (NGC).

1865 Li

1300
1864 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-1. Rarity-2. Repunched Date. EF Details--Cleaned (PCGS).

1864 Li

1200
1864 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-1. Rarity-2. Repunched Date. AU Details--Repaired (PCGS).

1864 Li

1100
1864 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-1. Rarity-2. Repunched Date. MS-63 (PCGS).

1864 Li

8000
1864 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. Proof-58 (PCGS).

1864 Li

1800
1864 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. Proof-62 (PCGS).

1864 Li

2000
1863 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-1. Rarity-3-. VF-30 (PCGS).

1863 Li

1300
1862 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-1. Rarity-3. MS-63 (NGC). CAC.

1862 Li

7000
1862 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. Proof-62 (ANACS). OH.

1862 Li

2200

Lot:3478  1869自由坐美元 PCGS MS 64

进入专场

拍品分类 世界钱币>银币 品相 PCGS MS64
拍品估价 USD 9000 成交价 USD 9000
拍卖专场 SBP2018年8月ANA-美国钱币#6 拍卖公司 SBP
开拍日期 2018-08-17 21:00:00 结标日期 2018-08-18 07:00:00 拍卖状态 成交
拍品描述 1869 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. OC-5. Rarity-3+. Misplaced Date. MS-64 (PCGS).A predominantly brilliant, highly lustrous example awash in smooth satin luster. Sharply struck, and a delight to behold. The circulation strike 1869 silver dollar is a curious issue the backstory for which has been debated by numismatic scholars. What is certain is that a mintage of 423,700 pieces represents a significant increase over the Mints yearly silver dollar output from 1861 through 1868. Opinions differ, however, as to the why of this sudden increase. Two opposing views are presented by Q. David Bowers in his 1993 <em>Silver Dollars and Trade Dollars of the United States: A Complete Encyclopedia</em>:<em>"[John M.] Willem states that the Mexican peso fell out of favor with Chinese merchants (due to a new tax in Mexico), and that the large business strike coinage of Liberty Seated dollars from 1869 onward was accomplished to provide coins for export to take advantage of the situation. However, opinions differ on this (see immediately below)."</em>The following is by R.W. Julian:<em>"The heavy coinage of silver dollars in the late 1860s can be shown to be the result of another imbalance in trade for silver. Prior to about 1868 the U.S. usually exported more silver than it produced and imported and there was little need for a dollar coinage. After that time, however, there was no other place for the excess silver to go and it was therefore coined into dollars, even though they did not circulate. It was a practical way to store silver with a readily known and guaranteed value. That some of these dollars did go to the Orient I again have no doubt, but I think that there was less than 25,000 annually and perhaps considerably less considering the ready availability of silver ingots in any purity desired."</em>Given that the 1869 is scarce to rare in all grades, we are inclined to agree with Willems suggestion that large numbers of these coins were shipped to the Orient. Other scholars agree, such as Hepburn in <em>History of Currency in the United States</em>, who states that the increase in silver dollar coinage from 1868 to 1872 was "chiefly due to the rich discoveries of Nevada" and, more to the point, that "....practically all were exported." This is certainly one of the few circulation strike 1869 silver dollars in any grade that has passed through our hands in recent memory, and as a conditionally rare near-Gem it represents a particularly important find for the astute silver dollar collector.From The Des Moines Collection.