1879 Liberty Seated Half Dollar. Proof-67 Cameo (NGC).

1879 Li

8000
1888 Liberty Seated Half Dollar. WB-101. MS-66+ (PCGS). CAC.

1888 Li

7500
1890 Liberty Seated Half Dollar. Proof-66+ (PCGS). CAC--Gold Label.

1890 Li

4500
1895-O Barber Half Dollar. MS-66 (PCGS). Secure Holder.

1895-O

8000
1895-S Barber Half Dollar. MS-66 (PCGS).

1895-S

9500
1919-D Walking Liberty Half Dollar. MS-63 (PCGS). CAC.

1919-D

10000
1921-D Walking Liberty Half Dollar. MS-64 (PCGS). CAC.

1921-D

15000
1921-D Walking Liberty Half Dollar. MS-63 (PCGS).

1921-D

8800
1921-S Walking Liberty Half Dollar. MS-63 (NGC). CAC.

1921-S

28000
1921-S Walking Liberty Half Dollar. AU-53 (PCGS).

1921-S

8000
1944 Walking Liberty Half Dollar. MS-68 (NGC).

1944 Wa

7500
1950 Franklin Half Dollar. Proof-68 (NGC).

1950 Fr

15000
1953-S Franklin Half Dollar. MS-65 FBL (PCGS).

1953-S

14000
1794年飘逸长发银币 PCGS MS 64

1794年飘逸

2000000
1797 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. BB-72, B-2. Rarity-4. Stars 9x7, Small Letters. AU-53 (PCGS).

1797 Dr

36000
1850-O Liberty Seated Half Dollar. WB-Unlisted. MS-65 (NGC).

1850-O

7000
1837 Capped Bust Half Dollar. Reeded Edge. 50 CENTS. GR-4. Rarity-3. MS-66 (PCGS).

1837 Ca

25000
1828 Capped Bust Half Dollar. O-104. Rarity-3. Curl Base, No Knob 2. MS-64+ (PCGS). CAC.

1828 Ca

13000
1819 Capped Bust Half Dollar. O-108. Rarity-3. MS-65 (NGC).

1819 Ca

12000
1817 Capped Bust Half Dollar. O-106. Rarity-2. MS-66 (PCGS).

1817 Ca

22000
1815/2 Capped Bust Half Dollar. O-101. Rarity-2. AU-55 (PCGS).

1815/2

11000
1810 Capped Bust Half Dollar. O-102a. Rarity-2. MS-64 (PCGS).

1810 Ca

8000
1806 Draped Bust Half Dollar. O-125, T-14. Rarity-5. Pointed 6, Stem Through Claw. AU-58 (PCGS).

1806 Dr

8000
1806 Draped Bust Half Dollar. O-120, T-28. Rarity-3. Pointed 6, Stem Through Claw. MS-64 (PCGS).

1806 Dr

23000
1797 Draped Bust Half Dollar. Small Eagle. O-101, T-1. Rarity-4+. Net AG-3 (ANACS). Good Details--Sc

1797 Dr

12000
1797 Draped Bust Half Dollar. Small Eagle. O-101a, T-1. Rarity-4+. Good-4 (PCGS).

1797 Dr

30000
1795 Flowing Hair Half Dollar. O-117a, T-3. Rarity-4. Two Leaves. EF-40 (PCGS).

1795 Fl

7750
1795 Flowing Hair Half Dollar. O-105a, T-25. Rarity-4. Two Leaves. MS-62 (NGC).

1795 Fl

50000
1927-S Standing Liberty Quarter. MS-62 FH (NGC).

1927-S

14000
1926-D Standing Liberty Quarter. MS-64 FH (PCGS). CAC.

1926-D

9000

Lot:2099  1853-o自由座洋半美元 PCGS VF 35

进入专场

拍品分类 外国钱币>银币 品相 PCGS VF35
拍品估价 USD 400000 成交价 USD 517000
拍卖专场 SBP2017年8月ANA-白金之夜 拍卖公司 SBP
开拍日期 2017-08-04 08:30:00 结标日期 2017-08-04 11:30:00 拍卖状态 成交
拍品描述 Legendary 1853-O No Arrows Half Dollar
Finest of Just Four Examples Known
The Garrett Specimen

1853-O Liberty Seated Half Dollar. No Arrows. WB-NC-1. Rarity-7+. VF-35 (PCGS).
The famous 1853-O No Arrows half dollar, one of the rarest and most desirable of all Liberty Seated coins. A pleasing mid grade example of the type, both sides are evenly toned in pearl gray patina that is perhaps a bit lighter on the obverse. The surfaces are smooth in hand, certainly more so than one might expect in an early New Orleans Mint silver coin that saw this extensive circulation. Remaining detail is uniformly bold with sharper definition noted for the more protected elements of the design. A pleasing Choice VF that ranks as the finest of only four known examples of this fabled issue.
How did the 1853-O No Arrows half dollar issue come about, and why it is so rare? The Philadelphia Mint shipped new dies to the New Orleans Mint in late 1852, as was common practice, so that new coinage could begin in January. Shipping took time, as this era did not have efficient railroads and the safest route was by sea, which required several days passage from the East Coast to the Port of New Orleans. Research by Richard Kelly and Nancy Oliver, published in their March 26, 2011, Coin World article titled "Curious Origin for 1853-O Without Arrows and Rays Halves," recounts an article that appeared in The Daily Picayune, a newspaper published by the New Orleans offices of the Times-Picayune. Dated January 2, 1853, the article states:
"The officers of the Mint in our city marked the opening of the New Year by very appropriately making a new issue of American coin. How extensive that was we are unable to say, but the twenty dollar gold piece and silver half dollar laid on our table for examination, as the product of the massive stamping machinery on the first day of the year, 1853, were admirable specimens of elegant design and finish."
This article would seem to account for the earliest appearance of this rare issue for, with the date of striking given as January 1, 1853, the half dollars produced on that day were almost certainly examples of the 1853-O No Arrows. Recall that during this period the California Gold Rush was well under way, with gold pouring out of the fields, streams and valleys into boats for passage to the Philadelphia Mint and Eastern banks, the entire affair disrupting gold prices relative to silver. This caused the price ratio of gold to silver to drop on the gold side, making silver more valuable than before. After 1850 it cost more than face value to strike silver coins. Accordingly, those that were made went into the hands of speculators and melters with yearly mintages dropping accordingly. By early 1853 it cost 53 cents in silver to coin a half dollar, and scarcely any were seen in circulation. In fact, most examples struck from 1850 through early 1853 were lost through melting, and survival rates are only a fraction of the mintages.
Congress, ever ready to pass laws after dutiful and thoughtful examination, finally addressed this crisis with the Mint Act of February 21, 1853, to be adopted on April 1 of that year. This Act reduced the amount of silver required for all coinage except the silver dollar, which for tradition's sake was left at the earlier standard. The half dollar was reduced in weight from 208 grains to 192 grains (13.36 grams to 12.44 grams), a reduction of about 7%. This reduction would bring the silver value of a half dollar slightly below face value, thereby stopping further melting of new coins issued after adoption of this Act. The Philadelphia Mint determined to identify this revised silver standard by placing arrows at the date of all silver coinage (other than the silver three-cent piece, which was already only 75% pure silver in content and could not be melted profitably). The newly authorized quarters and half dollars of 1853 were further distinguished by the addition of a glory of rays on the reverse around the eagle. The Arrows and Rays type would stand to "announce" to the general public that these coins were struck to the new reduced weight standard for silver coins, thus they should not be melted as no profit could be made from this venture. As silver coins were in strong demand across the nation, the new dies were prepared and shipped to the branch mints where coinage began in earnest on April 1 to the new standard. It would seem logical that older, heavier (and, hence, more valuable) silver coins struck before this revised standard would be gathered up and melted, including by the Treasury Department, to be coined again at the new lower weight standard. Today it seems hard to imagine that speculators would have so efficiently gathered up millions upon millions of silver coins and had them all melted for the modest spread, given the cost of transport, smelting costs and general risks of such an endeavor in a wildly fluctuating metals market. Regardless of who actually melted most of the old tenor silver coins, one fact is clear, not many of those earlier dated pieces exist today, especially those struck in 1850, 1851, 1852 and early 1853.
Given that the Arrows and Rays coinage was not authorized until February 21, the half dollars struck in the New Orleans Mint and referred to as "the product of the massive stamping machinery on the first day of the year, 1853," in the aforementioned article in The Daily Picayune could only have been No Arrows examples produced to the old weight standard. Unfortunately the mintage of this issue was not recorded, and we also do not know if additional examples were struck between January 1 and the introduction of the new weight standard and associated Arrows and Rays design. It was common practice to use old dies for coinage until they broke or were otherwise no longer serviceable. Indeed, continuing the use of serviceable dies on hand in one year for coinage of the next year was actually standard mint practice. Research by Liberty Seated half dollar experts Bill Bugert and Randy Wiley shows that the reverse of the 1853-O No Arrows is the same as that used to strike 1852-O coins from the WB-2 die marriage. It is most readily identifiable by a faint die line from the eagle's right leg to the underside of the right wing, a feature discernible on the present example with the aid of a loupe. Research by Walter Breen shows that 19 reverse dies were on hand in the New Orleans Mint in 1851, with production somewhat limited by the aforementioned rise in silver price, and by 1852 these dies were not being used as rapidly due to the resultant decrease in production. There were certainly several potential reverse dies available by the end of 1852, and with the new obverse dies arriving at that time, coinage could have begun on January 1 of the following year, as normal for the period, and it obviously did so.
The absence of a mintage figure for the 1853-O No Arrows in federal archives is also not without precedent in U.S. coinage history. Several issues are known to have been struck, the number of examples coined lost to history. The 1824 Capped Bust dime is a case in point, all examples of which were apparently struck and released in 1825 with coins of that date. The fact that New Orleans Mint personnel did not report the mintage of 1853-O No Arrows half dollars is likely because the Act of February 21, 1853 made those coins obsolete.
Estimates on the number of 1853-O No Arrows half dollars struck vary from several hundred to several thousand pieces, certainly no more than 3,000 to 4,000 coins. Regardless of how many examples were actually produced, virtually all were destroyed through melting, particularly after the Act of February 21, 1853 replaced these coins with their lighter-weight Arrows and Rays counterparts. Today, only four examples of this rare and enigmatic issue are positively confirmed to exist, the first of which was announced by John W. Haseltine circa 1881. The most recently discovered specimen made its numismatic auction debut in our Philadelphia ANA Rarities Night Auction of August 2012. The four known examples are as follows:
1 - PCGS VF-35. Ex John W. Haseltine, circa 1881; W. Elliott Woodward's sale of the J. Colvin Randall Collection, June 1885, lot 421; Harold P. Newlin; T. Harrison Garrett to Robert and John Work Garrett, by descent, 1888; Robert Garrett interest to John Work Garrett, 1919; transfer completed 1921; John Work Garrett to the Johns Hopkins University, by gift, 1942; our (Bowers and Ruddy's) sale of the Garrett Collection for The Johns Hopkins University, Part I, November 1979, lot 339; our (Stack's) sale of the Queller Family Collection of U.S. Half Dollars, October 2002, lot 530; our (Bowers and Merena's) sale of Jim Gray's North Carolina Collection, July 2004, lot 2332; our (Stack's) sale of the George "Buddy" Byers Collection, October 2006, lot 1160. The present example.

2 - PCGS VG-8. Ex Howell Family estate; our Philadelphia ANA Auction of August 2012, lot 11447. This is the first 1853-O No Arrows half dollar discovered since 1909, and it was nearly lost to the numismatic community. This half dollar was long held in a Northwestern family as part of a group of silver coins stored in a suitcase in the basement. When the wife of the original owner passed away, the coins were discovered and examined by the heirs, one person noticing an odd, old half dollar of 1853 and looked it up in a coin reference, where it was noted to be a "no arrows or rays" piece. The coin was taken to a local coin shop along with the additional silver coins and nearly sold for $15 with the balance of the holding. Numismatically insignificant bulk silver coin purchases are usually directed to one of the various smelters and sold for scrap silver value, then melted and turned into silver bars. The heirs wisely decided to keep this one particular coin, however, and after further examination made the fortuitous decision to contact Stack's Bowers Galleries, where we were given the opportunity to examine photos of the coin. The coin did not appear to be altered or even counterfeit as so commonly seen on such new discoveries, and we requested and received the opportunity to examine the coin in person. The coin was eventually submitted to PCGS where, after confirming the diagnostics and weight, it was indeed determined to be a new discovery and the fourth known 1853-O No Arrows half dollar.
3 - VG-8. Ex Chicago trolley car conductor, circa 1909; his supervisor; Stevens and Co. (Chicago); Charles Wilcox (Chicago); DeWitt Smith; H.O. Granberg, exhibited at the 1911 ANA convention; William H. Woodin; Waldo C. Newcomer; B. Max Mehl; "Colonel" E.H.R. Green; Charles M. Williams; Numismatic Gallery; Numismatic Gallery's Adolphe Menjou Sale, June 1950, lot 1084; Louis E. Eliasberg, Sr.; our (Bowers and Merena's) sale of the Louis E. Eliasberg, Sr. Collection, April 1997, lot 1955. According to the September 3, 1911 issue of the Philadelphia Inquirer, this coin was found in circulation, taken as part of a Chicago trolley car fare on the Cottage Avenue car. The conductor turned the coin in at the barn, where his supervisor apparently recognized it significance, replaced it with another half dollar, and sold the coin to Steven & Co., Chicago, for $5. The coin was then sold to Charles Wilcox for $100, then to DeWitt Smith of Lee, Massachusetts, for $500. Smith turned down $2,500 for the coin, but it eventually found its way into the collection of H.O. Granberg of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. When Louis E. Eliasberg, Sr. acquired this coin it was one of only two pieces he needed to complete his collection of United States coinage (the other was the unique 1873-CC No Arrows Liberty Seated dime).
4 - PCGS Good-6. Ex S.H. and H. Chapman's sale of the Colin E. King Collection, April 1892, lot 854; "Colonel" E.H.R. Green; our (Stack's) Anderson-Dupont Sale, November 1954, lot 2143; our (Stack's) Empire Sale, November 1957, lot 1394; Hollinbeck Coin Company; our (Stack's) R.E. Cox, Jr. Sale, April 1962, lot 1928; our (Stack's) E. Yale Clarke Sale, October 1975, lot 289; Julian Leidman; NASCA's sale of November 1977, lot 742; Herbert I. Melnick, Inc.'s sale of July 1982, lot 1712; Julian Leidman; Jules Reiver; Julian Leidman; Jonathan Kern; Charles Barasch; New York collection; Charles Barasch; Julian Leidman; Kenneth Goldman; South Florida Rare Coins; our sale of The 1853 Collection, October 2014, lot 10026.
Obviously one of the most significant offerings in this sale, the opportunity to acquire the finest known of only four 1853-O No Arrows half dollars deserves the attention of advanced collectors specializing in Liberty Seated coinage, the New Orleans Mint, or the connoisseur with a taste for numismatic rarities. We anticipate keen bidder interest and fierce competition when this coin comes up for auction.
The 1853-O No Arrows half dollar is ranked #58 in the popular book 100 Greatest U.S. Coins by Jeff Garrett and Ron Guth.
PCGS# 6270. NGC ID: 27SX.
Provenance: Ex John W. Haseltine, circa 1881; W. Elliott Woodward's sale of the J. Colvin Randall Collection, June 1885, lot 421; Harold P. Newlin; T. Harrison Garrett to Robert and John Work Garrett, by descent, 1888; Robert Garrett interest to John Work Garrett, 1919; transfer completed 1921; John Work Garrett to the Johns Hopkins University, by gift, 1942; our (Bowers and Ruddy's) sale of the Garrett Collection for The Johns Hopkins University, Part I, November 1979, lot 339; our (Stack's) sale of the Queller Family Collection of U.S. Half Dollars, October 2002, lot 530; our (Bowers and Merena's) sale of Jim Gray's North Carolina Collection, July 2004, lot 2332; our (Stack's) sale of the George "Buddy" Byers Collection, October 2006, lot 1160.