1794 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-18b. Head of 1793. Rarity-4. Mint State-63 BN (PCGS).

1794 Li

200000 - 250000
1794 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-24. Head of 1794. Rarity-1. Mint State-67 RB (PCGS).

1794 Li

200000 - 250000
1794 Liberty Cap Cent. S-26. Sheldon-26. Head of 1794. Rarity-2. Mint State-66 RB (PCGS).

1794 Li

120000 - 160000
1794 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-45. Head of 1794. Rarity-5+. Mint State-65 RB (PCGS).

1794 Li

120000 - 150000
1794 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-57. Head of 1794. Rarity-1. Mint State-65 RB (PCGS).

1794 Li

100000 - 130000
1794 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-69. Head of 1795. Rarity-3. Mint State-65 RB (PCGS).

1794 Li

120000 - 150000
1794 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-71. Head of 1795. Rarity-2. Mint State-65 RB (PCGS).

1794 Li

180000 - 200000
1795 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-75. Lettered Edge. Rarity-3. Mint State-65+ RB (PCGS).

1795 Li

100000 - 130000
1795 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-76b. Plain Edge. Rarity-1. Mint State-65 BN (PCGS).

1795 Li

25000 - 40000
1795 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-80. Jefferson Head. Plain Edge. Rarity-5+. Very Fine-20 (PCGS).

1795 Li

90000 - 120000
1796 Liberty Cap Cent. Liberty Cap. Sheldon-84. Liberty Cap. Rarity-3. Mint State-66+ RB (PCGS).

1796 Li

160000 - 200000
1796 Draped Bust Cent. Draped Bust. Sheldon-110. Draped Bust. Reverse of 1794. Rarity-3+. Mint State

1796 Dr

120000 - 150000
1797 Draped Bust Cent. Sheldon-135. Reverse of 1797, With Stems. Rarity-3+. Mint State-66 RB (PCGS).

1797 Dr

60000 - 70000
1797 Draped Bust Cent. Sheldon-138. Reverse of 1797, With Stems. Rarity-1. Mint State-66 RB (PCGS).

1797 Dr

60000 - 70000
1797 Draped Bust Cent. Sheldon-140. Reverse of 1797, With Stems. Rarity-1. Mint State-66 RB (PCGS).

1797 Dr

100000 - 130000
1793 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-14. Liberty Cap. Rarity-5-. About Uncirculated-53+ (PCGS).

1793 Li

300000 - 350000
1793 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-13. Liberty Cap. Rarity-4-. About Uncirculated-55 (PCGS).

1793 Li

200000 - 250000
1793 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-13. Liberty Cap. Rarity-4-. About Uncirculated-58 (PCGS).

1793 Li

400000 - 450000
1854 Braided Hair Half Cent. Cohen-1, Breen-1. Rarity-1. Mint State-66 RB (PCGS).

1854 Br

7000 - 8000
1852 Braided Hair Half Cent. First Restrike. Small Berries Reverse. Breen 1-B. Rarity-5. Proof-65+ B

1852 Br

7000 - 8000
1852 Braided Hair Half Cent. Original. Large Berries Reverse. Breen 1-D. Rarity-7+. Proof-65 RD (PCG

1852 Br

350000 - 400000
1842 Braided Hair Half Cent. Second Restrike. Small Berries Reverse. Breen 1-C. Rarity-7-. Reverse o

1842 Br

10000 - 15000
1842 Braided Hair Half Cent. First Restrike. Small Berries Reverse. Breen 1-B. Rarity-6+. Proof-65 R

1842 Br

9000 - 12000
1841 Braided Hair Half Cent. Original. Large Berries Reverse. Breen 1-A. Rarity-5. Proof-67 BN (PCGS

1841 Br

10000 - 15000
1836 Classic Head Half Cent. Second Restrike. Reverse of 1840. Breen 1-C. Rarity-7. Proof-66 RB (PCG

1836 Cl

50000 - 60000
1836 Classic Head Half Cent. First Restrike. Reverse of 1836. Breen 1-A. Rarity-7. Proof-65 RB (PCGS

1836 Cl

50000 - 60000
1836 Classic Head Half Cent. Original. Breen 1-A. Rarity-5. Proof-66 BN (PCGS).

1836 Cl

40000 - 50000
1835 Classic Head Half Cent. Cohen-1, Breen-1. Rarity-1. Mint State-65+ RB (PCGS).

1835 Cl

3500 - 4000
1834 Classic Head Half Cent. Cohen-1, Breen-1. Rarity-6 as a Proof. Proof-65 BN (PCGS).

1834 Cl

9000 - 10000
1833 Classic Head Half Cent. Cohen-1, Breen-1. Rarity-1. Mint State-66 RB (PCGS).

1833 Cl

7000 - 8000

Lot:5093  1794年自由帽一美分 PCGS MS 64

进入专场

拍品分类 外国钱币 品相 PCGS MS64
拍品估价 USD 500000 - 575000 成交价 USD 540500
拍卖专场 SBP-苏富比2017年3月波格集藏V 拍卖公司 SBP
开拍日期 2017-04-01 07:30:00 结标日期 2017-04-01 12:30:00 拍卖状态 成交
拍品描述 1794年自由帽一美分 PCGS MS 64。1794 Liberty Cap Cent. Sheldon-18b. Head of 1793. Rarity-4. Mint State-64 BN (PCGS). Whats the chance of my seeing a few of your lovely 94s one more time - R.E. "Ted" Naftzger to John W. Adams, February 1, 1976One of the most magnificent 1794 cents of any variety extant, this is the finest surviving example of the Head of 1793 type. Its distinctive surfaces offer a glimpse of what the first 1794 cents looked like when they left the Mint. Rather than the warm gloss and rolling cartwheel typical of most early cents that have survived in high grade, this cents obverse is prooflike, with reflective luster dramatically displayed across the fields of that side. The reverse, while not prooflike, is astoundingly frosty, with profound cartwheel spinning sedately within the broad triangular denticles that serve to make the cents of 1794 through 1796 a type discrete from the beaded bordered 1793 Liberty Cap cents that preceded them. The central obverse device echoes Joseph Wrights portrait of Liberty from 1793, though large cent aficionados have long focused uncharitably on the double chin that gives this variety is moniker.

The portrait is better exemplified on this specimen than any other survivor from these dies, offering the full depth and richness of Libertys image intended by the engraver. The central strike is firm and definitive on both sides, though the alignment of the obverse has created particularly deep denticles at the base of that side while sacrificing those above LIBERTY. The reverse is better centered, though the lower denticles are longer than those at the top. All design elements are so well developed that this coin has been "conjectured to be [a] presentation striking," as noted by Breen; its near-perfection does not necessarily suggest intent, but it makes this piece especially lovely nonetheless. It is likely that all early die state strikes from these dies were similarly prooflike and well struck, but only a precious few have survived in Mint State grade or even any state of preservation close to it.The obverse blends golden highlights with violet and blue over tan surfaces that have coolly toned down from their original red. The liveliness and luster within the golden areas and around the devices is particularly close to the original mint color. The olive brown reverse also retains precious bloom from the original red, pleasantly toned down in such a way that appears even to the naked eye but variegated under a light and lens. Some ancient spots and specks among the leaves between ST of STATES and O of ONE are harmless and stable, as is a related speck within D of UNITED. The reverse retains no marks aside from those subtle ones that predate striking, mostly seen at the ends of the denticles. Similar marks were not sufficiently struck out of the planchet in the vicinity of LIBERTY on the obverse, and a scattering of microscopic chatter is seen on the high relief of Libertys portrait. No marks are individually significant on either side.

The die state has been termed III by Breen, but it is identical to Die State I of Sheldon-18a and represents the earliest known state of this variety. Light vestiges of clash marks are seen beneath ST of STATES and, less notably, elsewhere within the wreath. These clash marks remain from the previous marriage of this reverse, Sheldon-17. A lapping line spikes forth from the leaf cluster below F of OF. The dangling end of the ribbon at right appears somewhat hollow in areas, but is much more complete than seen in later states, when lapping removes the detail from the center and end of the ribbon. A short die crack extends from the denticles of the obverse near 8:00. Some light die finishing lines are seen beneath and among the digits of the date, and the first date digit is clearly somewhat recut. The edge, the so-called "edge of 1794," is used on most cents of this date. It shows the leaf following the word DOLLAR pointing up, rather than the downward posture it assumes on the lettered edges common to cents of 1793, a characteristic identified by the Sheldon-18bs alphabetical suffix.If 1794 cents are large cent royalty, this coin is the Crown Prince of this date. Its quality is incomparable and its provenance is perhaps even better. The list of owners of this coin is made more astounding by the fact that it spent seven decades in the trays of the Garrett Collection, housed for most of that time at Evergreen House in Baltimore. Before this coin was sold at public auction in 2013, it had not been put up for bids in over a century. Every link in its provenance chain tells a story. One sale was delayed by President Lincolns assassination. Another would have never occurred but for derring-do and an academic appetite for ancient coins that exceeded that for coins of the United States. It has been described as "entirely uncirculated" by W. Elliot Woodward (and by Frossard, who later borrowed this same phrase), "a beauty in every respect" by David Proskey, "as far as I know, unique" by Dr. Edward Maris, and a "blazer" by Ted Naftzger. J.N.T. Levick, more quaintly, noted that the coin was "very fine, or quite Unc." When Ted Naftzger wrote to John W. Adams to ask, "Whats the chance of my seeing a few of your lovely 94s one more time?" this coin was literally at the top of his list.Its story begins, of course, in 1794, after the death of engraver Joseph Wright. Wrights new but familiar design, directly inspired by Augustin Dupres 1783 Libertas Americana medal, was used on the Liberty Cap cents of 1793.

The obverse hubs Wright made, depicting the head a young woman superimposed upon a liberty pole and cap, outlived him. This classic design would be reimagined by Robert Scot, but not before three obverse dies were sunk with Wrights head of Liberty. Those dies, used to strike Sheldon numbers 17, 18, 19, and 20, are known today as the Head of 1793. Walter Breen suggested that the first cent delivery of 1794, numbering 11,000 coins, composed the entire mintage of the Heads of 1793. Four more groups of cents were delivered before the end of January. It is unlikely the relationship between die varieties and deliveries are as crisp and definite as the literature would indicate, but these varieties were undoubtedly the first 1794 cents struck and the first to enter circulation. Most stayed in circulation for decades, considering their typical levels of significant wear.Given this coins elevated state of preservation, its useful life as a lubricant of commerce must have ended shortly after it began. Perhaps, it never strayed far from home, as the first cabinet it appeared in was, like the mint that made it, begun in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. John Fox McCoy was a leather merchant from Easton, a success story who rose from clerk to partner in the decade before the Civil War. He moved to New York, settled in Brooklyn, and served in 1864 on a committee of men in the shoe and clothing business to support the U.S. Sanitary Fair, held to benefit wounded Union solders. His brother, A. Ramsey McCoy, was three years younger and likewise inherited the collector gene, preferring tokens and medals over the coins that John gathered with such vigor.McCoy was well liked, described by Emmanuel Joseph Attinelli in Numisgraphics in 1876 as "genial, affable, [and] generous." Attinellis depiction of his "ruddy complexion," "eye usually beaming with a smile" and a build that left him "slightly inclined to be portly in size" makes him sound as if hed fit in just fine on the bourse floor today.

"It is much to be regretted that he so early left the numismatic field," Attinelli said, though the reason why was left unsaid. As was common in that era, McCoy sold his cabinet intact to W. Elliot Woodward, who then cataloged it and presented it at auction. Woodward, already a veteran presence on the numismatic scene, noted that this cent "may properly be called a proof" and "in this condition [was] of the highest rarity."It was purchased by Joseph N.T. Levick and incorporated into his superb collection of cents, which Levick himself cataloged for sale just a year later. The auction was scheduled for April 27, 1865, long before President Lincoln would be felled by an angry actor, who would in turn be tracked down and shot himself just a day before the sale was to be held. In late May, after the black crepe was taken down from a million American porches, the cent was finally sold. Ed Cogan had a chance to sell it in 1877, mentioning "I do not recollect ever to have seen three finer cents of this date in any one sale." Having room to illustrate just one, he decided upon the finest known example of what is today known as Sheldon-29 instead. When Ed. Frossards favorite cent customer went to sell his cabinet, he didnt make the same error. Instead, Frossard used the collection of George Merritt to illustrate the first work ever written on the entire series of large cents from 1793 to 1857. This cent is featured prominently atop Plate 1.Between 1879 and 1904, this cent found a home in two of the most famous American cabinets ever assembled, those of Lorin G. Parmelee of Boston and John G. Mills of Albany. After the Mills sale, conducted by the partnership of Henry and S. Hudson Chapman, it would join the collection with which it is still most often associated, that of Robert Garrett and his brother, John Work Garrett. Their father, T. Harrison Garrett, was one of the great collectors of the previous generation. Like most collectors, their interest receded as young men, but bloomed as successful adults. The Mills sale represented the rebirth of the Garrett Collections growth, and this coin was among the very first cents added to the cabinet since T. Harrisons passing in 1888.

In 1884, he acquired Ed. Frossards entire collection of 1794 cents, including an example of this variety in Very Fine. With the addition of this cent, and the deaccession of the Frossard coin, the Garrett assemblage took an enormous step forward, aiming not only toward completeness, but the finest available quality.Just as this became the second Hays-3 to be added to the Garrett Collection, it became the second one to be deaccessed from it. By 1973, the variety was known to many as Sheldon-18b, though most of an earlier generation, including Dr. Sheldon himself, persisted in identifying it with the attribution number assigned by Frossard and William Wallace Hays in 1893. John W. Adams was among these traditionalists. Adams pursuit of cents focused not just on quality, but also quality of provenance; it has been said that he collected collectors as much as he collected cents. This coin became a prime target for his collection. According to Harry Salyards monumental multipart series in Penny-Wise, drawn from the Adams archives, the first connection with Johns Hopkins University began in 1972. The following year, Adams traveled from Boston to Baltimore to see the collection and visit the curator, Carl Carlson. "My conscience will not permit those lovely cents to languish unattended in the basement," Adams wrote to Carlson, as he suggested a possible solution. "Please remember that if your budget for ancient coins requires buttressing, I would be happy to bid on all of the large cents (less whatever type material is required by you) or just for a few of the coins." Adams put an offer down in ink: "I would be willing to pay $3500 for the Hays-3 of 1794." A month later, Adams penned a thank you note to Carlson.

A check was enclosed. "I only hope that you will make many more additions to the ancient field so that you will be once again divesting duplicates in U.S. copper," Adams wrote. He had added 12 new 1794 cents to his cabinet. Still, 30 1794 cents remained in the Hopkins Collection, of which nine would be sold in a 1976 Stacks sale and 21 would remain until the entire U.S. portion of the collection was consigned to Bowers and Ruddy. Carlson thanked Adams via letter on February 27, offering his "hope [that] you still like them as much as you did last week" while adding that "it has been a real pleasure doing business with you."After Adams acquisition, this coin was not offered for auction for 40 years. It was cataloged and offered for sale as part of the Bowers and Ruddy fixed price list of Adams collection, but remained unsold. It was privately sold to Ted Naftzger in 1984, and moved alongside the large bloc of Naftzgers choice early date cents when they sold in 1992.Certified in 1992 as MS-64 BN by PCGS, this coin has remained alone atop their population data among all 1794 Head of 1793 cents, just as it has ranked in first position among the various permutations of a Condition Census published by Noyes, Bland, and others. Its primacy of quality is unchallenged, and the substance of its history is unique.