1853 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. Restrike. Proof-61 (PCGS).

1853 Li

23500
1854 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. Proof-65 Cameo (PCGS).

1854 Li

25000
1858 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. Proof-63 (NGC).

1858 Li

10000
1859 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. MS-64 (PCGS). CAC.

1859 Li

14000
1859-S Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. MS-63+ (PCGS).

1859-S

18000
1859-S Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. MS-61 (PCGS).

1859-S

9000
1862 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. Proof-66 Cameo (NGC).

1862 Li

20000
1863 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. Proof-65 (PCGS).

1863 Li

10000
1864 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. Proof-65 (PCGS). CAC. OGH.

1864 Li

15000
1869 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. MS-64 (NGC).

1869 Li

8000
1870-CC Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. MS-63 (PCGS).

1870-CC

30000
1879-CC Morgan Silver Dollar. MS-64+ PL (PCGS). CAC.

1879-CC

12000
1880-CC Morgan Silver Dollar. MS-67 PL (PCGS).

1880-CC

40000
1881 Morgan Silver Dollar. Proof-67+ (PCGS). CAC.

1881 Mo

14000
1881-S Morgan Silver Dollar. MS-68 PL (PCGS). Retro OGH.

1881-S

9000
1846-O Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. MS-63 (PCGS).

1846-O

15000
1839 Gobrecht Silver Dollar. Name Removed. Judd-105 Restrike, Pollock-117. Rarity-7-. Dannreuther Re

1839 Go

150000
1836 Gobrecht Silver Dollar. Name on Base. Original. Judd-60, Pollock-65. Rarity-1. Dannreuther Reve

1836 Go

8000
1836 Gobrecht Silver Dollar. Name on Base. Restrike. Judd-60, Pollock-65. Rarity-1. Dannreuther Reve

1836 Go

40000
1803 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. BB-252, B-5. Rarity-2. Small 3. AU-53 (PCGS).

1803 Dr

8000
1799/8 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. BB-141, B-3. Rarity-3. 15-Star Reverse. MS-63+ (NGC).

1799/8

35000
1798 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. Heraldic Eagle. BB-122, B-14. Rarity-3. Pointed 9, Wide Date. AU-55

1798 Dr

10000
1798 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. Small Eagle. BB-82, B-1. Rarity-3. 13 Stars. EF-40 (PCGS).

1798 Dr

10000
1798 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. Small Eagle. BB-82, B-1. Rarity-3. 13 Stars. AU-55 (PCGS).

1798 Dr

50000
1796 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. BB-65, B-5. Rarity-4. Large Date, Small Letters. EF-45 (PCGS).

1796 Dr

9000
1796 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. BB-65, B-5. Rarity-4. Large Date, Small Letters. MS-61 (NGC).

1796 Dr

9000
1796 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. BB-61, B-4. Rarity-3. Small Date, Large Letters. EF-45 (PCGS).

1796 Dr

9000
1796 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. BB-61, B-4. Rarity-3. Small Date, Large Letters. AU-53 (PCGS). OGH.

1796 Dr

10000
1796 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. BB-61, B-4. Rarity-3. Small Date, Large Letters. AU-58 (NGC).

1796 Dr

45000
1795 Draped Bust Silver Dollar. BB-52, B-15. Rarity-2. Centered Bust. AU Details--Cleaning (PCGS).

1795 Dr

8000

Lot:3169  1851年美国1美元银币 PCGS Proof 62

进入专场

拍品分类 外国钱币>银币 品相 PCGS Proof62
拍品估价 USD 270000 成交价 USD 0
拍卖专场 SBP2016年8月ANA-白金之夜#5 拍卖公司 SBP
开拍日期 2016-08-12 08:00:00 结标日期 2016-08-12 20:00:00 拍卖状态 流拍
拍品描述 1851 Liberty Seated Silver Dollar. Restrike--Overstruck on a New Orleans Mint Liberty Seated Silver Here is a lovely and highly significant coin that ranks among the most important offerings in this sale. It is a Philadelphia Mint restrike Proof 1851 Liberty Seated silver dollar overstruck on a New Orleans Mint host coin -- popularly referred to as the "1851-O" silver dollar.

The obverse shows the distinctive centered date of the restrike Proof 1851 dollar, while the reverse displays a somewhat flattened, yet still boldly visible O mintmark of the New Orleans Mint. No silver dollars were struck at New Orleans in 1851, nor did the facility produce Proof Liberty Seated dollars of any date, leading researchers to conclude that the host coin began as a circulation strike 1859-O or 1860-O silver dollar. It was then selected by personnel at the Philadelphia Mint as a host coin for a restrike Proof 1851 silver dollar, produced beginning in the spring of 1859, and almost certainly under the authority of Mint Director James Ross Snowden.

The rarity of the circulation strike 1851 silver dollar (see below) and the absence of original Proofs from that year made this a prime candidate for restriking. These restrikes were quickly recognized as rarities once numismatics as a hobby began to flourish in the United States during the late 1850s. This is an unofficial restrike for, while it was produced under Snowdens authority alongside similar pieces, striking was conducted in secret and sales went through Mint officials and employees rather than through official government channels. Even so, todays collectors can be thankful for this extensive manufacturing activity, as otherwise many important rarities from the earliest decades of U.S. Mint operations would be unobtainable.Writing in the 1993 reference <em>Silver Dollars & Trade Dollars of the United States: A Complete Encyclopedia</em>, Q. David Bowers estimates that 50 to 100 restrike Proof 1851 silver dollars were produced beginning in 1859. No original Proof 1851 dollars have been confirmed and, as previously stated, none are believed to have been produced (although some prooflike pieces have been designated as such in the past). No original Proofs are known from contemporary sets, and none were offered for public sale in 1851.

Given their rarity, the absence of original Proofs of this date, and the scarcity of circulation strike 1851 silver dollars, restrike Proof 1851 dollars enjoy strong demand among silver dollar date collectors and specialists in Liberty Seated coinage. Examples rarely remain on the open market for long. Unique as an 1851 silver dollar with remnants of an O mintmark clearly visible, the present restrike is clearly <em>very special</em>.Numismatists Q. David Bowers and Thomas K. DeLorey examined this restrike "1851-O" dollar at the 1992 American Numismatic Association convention and found that the host coin had been filed to fit the restraining collar used in the overstriking, rendering it perceptibly underweight (400.3 grains as opposed to the 412.5-grain standard). Additional research has confirmed that the Philadelphia Mint used two die pairs to produce restrike Proof 1851 dollars. The present coin was struck from the first die pair, distinguished by a short horizontal die line in the drapery just below Libertys right shoulder and a crescent, or lunule, on the upright of the digit 1 in the date.

Beginning in 1850 the rising price of silver in international markets made it impractical for the Mint to continue producing large quantities of silver coins as they cost more than face value to produce. Such pieces completely disappeared from circulation during the early 1850s and, specific to the silver dollar denomination, mintages of circulation strikes at the Philadelphia Mint were drastically curtailed in 1850, 1851 and 1852. (The New Orleans Mint achieved a modest mintage of 40,000 pieces in 1850 from local bullion deposits.) Masses of silver coins were exported for melting, resulting in a net loss of $23 million to domestic commerce.

The coins exported in 1850-1851, in fact, exceeded the total face value of all silver coins produced in the Philadelphia Mint over the course of the preceding 20 years. Circulation strike 1851 dollars, distinguished from the Proof restrikes by having the date set high in the lower obverse field, were produced to the extent of just 1,300 pieces. What few coins have survived from that delivery largely owe their existence to sharp-eyed bank tellers and others who recognized their rarity and set aside examples during the later decades of the 19th century.This "1851-O" dollar is bound to be the centerpiece in a connoisseurs collection of Liberty Seated dollars. It combines rarity, quality, and a <em>unique</em> story.<br />,,PCGS# 6979.Ex Heritages sale of August 1998, lot 8200; Ira & Larry Goldbergs sale of September 2003, lot 535; our (Stacks) sale of the Husky Collection, June 2008, lot 2025.