First Regiment Illinois National Guard. Honour El Merito badge. Gold. Tested at 9K. Unmarked as to i

First R

150
Illinois National Guard 1st Infantry Regiment. Long and Honorable Service Medal. Gold. Tested as 14.

Illinoi

1750
Illinois National Guard 1st Infantry Regiment. Long and Honorable Service Medal. Silver. By S.D. Chi

Illinoi

200
1813 Captain Stephen Decatur, Jr. / USS United States vs. HMS Macedonian. Original. Silver. 64.9 mm.

1813 Ca

20000
1812 Captain Jacob Jones / USS Wasp vs. HMS Frolic. Original. Silver. 64.5 mm. By Moritz Furst. Juli

1812 Ca

20000
(Circa 1810) 1757 Quaker Indian Peace or Treaty of Easton medal. Betts-401, Julian IP-49. White meta

(Circa

2000
1777 B. Franklin Americain Plaque. Terra Cotta. 115 mm. By Nini. Greenslet GM-5, Betts-548. Rarity-7

1777 B.

800
1776 (1790) Washington Before Boston Medal. Original. Bronze. 68.1 mm. Baker-47B, Julian MI-1. Rarit

1776 (1

16000
1776 (1790) Washington Before Boston Medal. Original. Bronze. 68.9 mm. Baker-47B, Julian MI-1. Rarit

1776 (1

4500
1776 (1790) Washington Before Boston Medal. Original. Bronze. 68.7 mm. 2,124.4 grains. Baker-47B. Ra

1776 (1

1500
1776 (1835-1880) Washington Before Boston Medal. Paris Mint, Second Restrike. Dark Bronze. 68.5 mm.

1776 (1

1200
1776 (1863-1889) Washington Before Boston Medal. Philadelphia Mint Third Restrike. Dark Bronze. 67.9

1776 (1

600
1776 (1890-1910) Washington Before Boston Medal. Philadelphia Mint Fourth Restrike. Dark Bronze. 68

1776 (1

600
1776 (2015) Washington Before Boston Medal. Paris Mint Restrike. Gold. 1 ounce. Proof-70 Ultra Cameo

1776 (2

2000
1786 Franklin Natus Boston Medal. Bronze. 44.1 mm. By Augustin Dupre. Betts-620. Plain Edge. Specime

1786 Fr

1000
1781 (2014) Libertas Americana Medal. Paris Mint Restrike. Silver. 5 ounces. Proof-70 Ultra Cameo (N

1781 (2

750
1781 (2014) Libertas Americana Medal. Paris Mint Restrike. Gold. 34 mm. 1 ounce. Proof-69 Ultra Came

1781 (2

1750
1781 (2014) Libertas Americana Medal. Paris Mint Restrike. Gold. 5 ounces. Proof-70 Ultra Cameo (NGC

1781 (2

9000
1781 (2000) Libertas Americana Medal. Paris Mint Restrike. Gold. 46.5 mm. Edge: Cornucopia, #467/500

1781 (2

3000
1781 (2000) Libertas Americana Medal. Paris Mint Restrike. Gold. 46.5 mm. Edge: Cornucopia, #373/500

1781 (2

3000
1781 (1782) Libertas Americana Medal. Original. Bronze. By Augustin Dupre. Betts-615. MS-62 BN (NGC)

1781 (1

15000
1781 (1782) Libertas Americana Medal. Original. Bronze. By Augustin Dupre. Betts-615. MS-63 BN (PCGS

1781 (1

17000
1781年自由女神带杆版银章 NGC MS 62

1781年自由

100000
1783 Treaty of Paris. Tin with Copper Plug. Betts-610. MS-65 (NGC).

1783 Tr

1000
Undated (1784) Captain James Cook Memorial Medal. Silver. 42mm. By L. Pingo. Betts-553, BHM-258, Eim

Undated

2000

Lot:1012  1847帕洛阿尔托及拉帕尔瓦战役金章 完未流通

进入专场

拍品分类 外国钱币 品相 完未流通
拍品估价 USD 70000 成交价 USD 94000
拍卖专场 SBP2016年8月ANA-美国钱币#2 拍卖公司 SBP
开拍日期 2016-08-10 09:00:00 结标日期 2016-08-10 21:00:00 拍卖状态 成交
拍品描述 1847帕洛阿尔托及拉帕尔瓦战役金章 完未流通。With rich yellow surfaces and the dense heft of solid gold, this unique medal makes an imposing impression. Approved by a unanimous Congress as a presentation award to Major General Zachary Taylor on July 16, 1846, this medal is truly one of a kind: the only example struck in gold and the precise specimen given to the victorious general who would soon be President.

The surfaces retain exemplary deep golden lustre and reflectivity, undimmed by trivial hairlines. A short, shallow scratch beneath Taylors chin is the only noteworthy mark on the fields of either side. A pinpoint toning spot is present in the upper right obverse field, parallel to T of TAYLOR, and a microscopic dark inclusion is located where it has been since the moment this medal was struck, just off the truncation of Taylors coat lapels. As expected with a medal this heavy struck in a composition this soft, there are some rim defects, though they are measured and minor. A light dent above Z of ZACHARY is the only visible mark on the obverse rim; it is entirely unsubstantial. On the reverse, a ripple of light impressions near 12 oclock may remain from a frame or enclosure, but they too are unserious. A broad but shallow bruise is barely notable above 9 oclock.<br /><br />Possessing richness that only fine gold displays, gravity that only a large medal carries, and history that only Congressionally awarded military medals can boast, this medal is one of the most important ever offered for auction. Congressionally awarded gold medals are extraordinarily rare, particularly in private hands. Zachary Taylor was the only party to ever receive three such medals, of which this was the first awarded. Through a twist a fate, all three have survived, and Stacks Bowers Galleries has offered all three. The first, a similar medal awarded to Taylor for the battle of Monterrey, was sold in January 2005 as part of the Part VII of the John J. Ford, Jr. sale. Taylors remarkable medal for Buena Vista achieved the world record sum of $460,000 in our November 2006 sale, a price that has never been surpassed for any medal struck by the United States Mint.

While several other pre-1900 Congressionally awarded gold medals have survived, few remain in private hands:

1. George Washington, for the British evacuation of Boston, 1775. Boston Public Library.<br />2. Horatio Gates, for the Battle of Saratoga, 1777. New-York Historical Society.<br />3. Anthony Wayne, for the Battle of Stony Point, 1779. Pennsylvania Sons of the American Revolution. Acquired at Sothebys in 1978.<br />4. Nathaniel Greene, for the Battle of Eutaw Springs, 1781. Rhode Island Historical Society.<br />5. Thomas Truxtun, for USS Constellation vs. La Vengeance, 1800. Smithsonian Institution.<br />6. Edward Preble, for operations against Tripoli, 1804. United States Naval Academy.<br />7. Isaac Hull, for USS<em> Constitution</em> vs. HMS<em> Guerriere</em>, 1812. Privately owned.<br />8. William Bainbridge, for USS<em> Constitution</em> vs. HMS<em> Java</em>, 1812. USS<em> Constitution</em> Museum.<br />9. William Henry Harrison, for the Battle of the Thames, 1813. Sold privately from descendants in 2015 for a price in excess of $200,000.<br />10. Robert Henley, for the Battle of Lake Champlain, 1814. Privately owned, last sold in the 2004 John J. Ford, Jr. sale, Part V. <br />11. Alexander Macomb, for the Battle of Plattsburgh, 1814. Sold in a Swiss auction in 2015 for approximately $225,000.<br />12. Winfield Scott, for battles on the Niagara Frontier, 1814. National Museum of the United States Army.<br />13. Andrew Jackson, for the Battle of New Orleans, 1815. American Numismatic Society.<br />14, 15, 16. Zachary Taylor, as described above.<br />17. Winfield Scott, for the Mexican War, 1848. Smithsonian Institution<br />18. U.S. Grant, for the Battle of Vicksburg, 1863. Smithsonian Institution.<br />19. Cyrus Field, for laying the Atlantic Cable, 1867. Privately owned.<br />20. Joseph Francis, for inventing a lifeboat, 1888. Smithsonian Institution. <br /><br />Oliver Hazard Perrys gold medal for the Battle of Lake Erie, awarded by the state of Pennsylvania, is in the collection of the United States Naval Academy, but it was not voted by Congress. Matthew C. Perrys gold medal for opening Japan, awarded by the merchants of Boston, was sold in a Maine auction in 2007.

Zachary Taylor died in 1850, just 16 months after rising to the Presidency. Five years earlier, he was a nearly unknown Army officer, a man with no political past or future. When his command was moved to Texas at the brink of the war with Mexico, Taylor was thrust into a position of prominence, one made historically significant when Texas was declared a state in December 1845. War followed soon thereafter. Taylor and his men, stationed near the Rio Grande, were at the tip of the spear, and by the time war was declared in May 1846 he had already won the first major victory of the war. The battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma were fought on successive days, May 8 and 9, 1846, on what is today American soil near Brownsville, Texas. Inflicting significant casualties against a superior Mexican force, Taylor and his men chased his opponents across the Rio Grande. A week later, Taylor followed, taking his army onto what is today Mexican soil. Taylors leadership received plaudits for the September 1846 battle at Monterrey and the enormous February 1847 battle at Buena Vista, and he became a national hero. Mexico City fell in September 1847, and a truce was declared in March 1848. Within a few months, Taylor was a leading Presidential candidate, a non-political being wooed by both parties.

On July 16, 1846, Congress unanimously voted to give Taylor a gold medal recognizing his victories near the Rio Grande; this is that medal. Mint Director Robert Maskell Patterson communicated with William L. Marcy, the Secretary of War, in December 1846, dictating the designs and size of the medal to be struck. Patterson calculated the expense of "8 oz fine gold," as close to pure as technology then allowed, at $165.36. The dies would cost an addition $600, plus $5 for an appropriate case and some other minor expenses. A number of bronze specimens and a silver gilt striking to be given to President James K. Polk were also authorized. The portrait was accomplished by John Gadsby Chapman, while the inscription and simple design of the reverse was suggested by Patterson himself.<br /><br />The presses at the Philadelphia Mint were powerful enough that, despite the remarkable high relief of the obverse, this medal was struck only once. The same obverse, and a nearly identical reverse, was featured on Taylors medal for Monterrey (misspelled Monterey on the medal). The medal he was awarded for Buena Vista was both larger and more intricate of design, likely because Taylor was the sitting President by the time it was struck. This medal, the first voted by Congress for a military action after the War of 1812, represents a pivot point in the history of the Congressional Gold Medal series. All that preceded it were awarded for victories, by land or by sea. After this medal, beginning with the 1847 medal for the mission to save the men of the U.S.S. <em>Somers,</em> Congress voted gold medals to veterans of rescue missions, technological innovators, philanthropy, and more. In the 20th century, Congressional gold medals were voted for primarily non-military figures: Lindbergh, Edison, Walt Disney, Arnold Palmer, and many more.

In the last century, it appears only four gold medals voted by Congress in the 18th or 19th centuries have sold in American auctions. One more has sold in Europe, and a small number have traded hands privately. The appearance of this medal, awarded to a future President for a military victory on American soil, has no analogues. Among those sold, only the medals presented to Anthony Wayne and Alexander Macomb was presented for a battle in the United States. Only the two previously sold medals presented to Zachary Taylor were awarded to a United States President. This medal stands astride those two areas of fascination, making it one of the most important American gold medals ever offered