1795 Capped Bust Right Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-3. Rarity-6. 9 Leaves. Mint State-63+ (PCGS).

1795 Ca

250,000-550,000
1807 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle.Bass Dannreuther-6. Rarity-4+. Mint State-64 (PCGS).

1807 Ca

25,000-40,000
1806 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-6. Rarity-2. Round Top 6, Stars 7 x 6. Mint Stat

1806 Ca

40,000-60,000
1807 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-1. Rarity-4+. Mint State-65+ (PCGS).

1807 Ca

87,500-150,000
1806 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-1. Rarity-4. Pointed 6, Stars 8 x 5. Mint State-

1806 Ca

40,000-70,000
1804 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-5. Rarity-6+. Normal 8 over Large 8. Mint State-

1804 Ca

40,000-80,000
1805 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-2. Rarity-4. Mint State-65 (PCGS).

1805 Ca

80,000-200,000
1804 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-1. Rarity-4+. Small 8. Mint State-64 (PCGS).

1804 Ca

25,000-40,000
1803/2 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-4. Rarity-4. Mint State-66+ (PCGS).

1803/2

140,000-350,000
1802/1 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-1. Rarity-4+. Mint State-66 (PCGS).

1802/1

140,000-350,000
1800 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-2. Rarity-3+. Mint State-64 (PCGS).

1800 Ca

40,000-80,000
1799 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-5. Rarity-5+. Large Reverse Stars. Mint State-63

1799 Ca

32,500-60,000
1798 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-6. Rarity-6. Small 8. Heraldic Eagle. About Unci

1798 Ca

12,000-25,000
1798 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-2. Rarity-5. Large 8, 13-Star Reverse, Narrow Da

1798 Ca

25,000-50,000
1798 Capped Bust Right Half Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-3. Rarity-5. Large 8, 14 Stars Reverse, Wide Dat

1798 Ca

20,000-33,000
1796 Capped Bust Right Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-1. Rarity-4. Mint State-62+ (PCGS).

1796 Ca

87,500-200,000
1797 Capped Bust Right Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-1. Rarity-5. Small Eagle. Mint State-61 (PCGS).

1797 Ca

87,500-175,000
1797 Capped Bust Right Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-4. Rarity-4+. Heraldic Eagle. Mint State-63 (PCGS).

1797 Ca

40,000-100,000
1798/7 Capped Bust Right Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-1. Rarity-4+. Stars 9x4. Mint State-62+ (PCGS).

1798/7

87,500-175,000
1798/7 Capped Bust Right Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-2. Rarity-6-. Stars 7x6. Mint State-61 (PCGS).

1798/7

120,000-275,000
1799 Capped Bust Right Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-7. Rarity-3. Small Obverse Stars. Mint State-64+ (PCG

1799 Ca

80,000-175,000
1799 Capped Bust Right Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-10. Rarity-3. Large Obverse Stars. Mint State-65+ (PC

1799 Ca

122,500-275,000
1800 Capped Bust Right Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-1. Rarity-3+. Mint State-63+ (PCGS).

1800 Ca

50,000-85,000
1799 Capped Bust Right Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-10. Rarity-3. Large Obverse Stars. Mint State-65 (PCG

1799 Ca

120,000-175,000
1801 Capped Bust Right Eagle. Bass Dannreuther-2. Rarity-2. Mint State-64+ (PCGS).

1801 Ca

80,000-150,000
1801 Capped Bust Right Eagle. 1801 Bass Dannreuther-2. Rarity-2. Mint State-65 (PCGS).

1801 Ca

140,000-300,000

Lot:2092  1795美国金币 Capped Bust Right Eagle PCGS MS 66+

进入专场

拍品分类 外国钱币 品相 PCGS MS66+
拍品估价 USD 550,000-1,500,000 成交价 USD 2585000
拍卖专场 SBP-苏富比2015年9月纽约波格集藏Ⅱ 拍卖公司 SBP
开拍日期 2015-10-01 07:00:00 结标日期 2015-10-01 12:00:00 拍卖状态 成交
拍品描述 "The eagle is not a very expressive or apt appellation for the largest gold piece, but nothing better occurs." -- Alexander Hamilton, 
On the Establishment of a Mint, 1791

The most glorious 1795 eagle known, this coin is the single finest survivor from the first year of the largest gold coin authorized by the Mint Act of 1792. Only a gold rush of historic proportions, begun in a territory acquired by the United States after a half century of relentless westward expansion, was able to displace the eagle from its position atop the hierarchy of American coinage. Until the 1850 introduction of the double eagle, there was no larger gold coin struck in American mints and no higher denomination American coin in use. This superlative example is generally acknowledged as not only the finest gold coin from the famous Garrett Collection, but quite possibly the finest 18th century United States gold coin in existence.

The satiny surfaces glow with color, embracing the richest gold with fire-lit hints of deep orange and traces of violet at the peripheries. Lustrous from every aspect and angle, what appears to be satiny in raking light becomes deeply reflective when the light is redirected, and every twist makes lively cartwheel spin anew. The aesthetic appeal is incontrovertibly ideal, and all numismatists who have seen this coin will agree that it is, simply, the ultimate example of the type. An examination with the assistance of magnification finds no defects of import, a thin line between the nose and TY of LIBERTY on the obverse and another line from the top of the wing at left on the reverse standing in for something more consequential. Some light hairlines are so inconsequential that mentioning them seems rude. This coin’s primacy among eagles of its type is secure, no matter what the standard or whom the examiner. Its position atop the census will never be surpassed.

Despite the large diameter of the eagle denomination, the Mint's coiner did excellent work on his first attempt. The strike is sound, producing bold details on both sides. Minor adjustment marks are visible on the eagle's breast and leg, less noticeable among the denticles above ICA. An S-shaped lintmark is seen right of the eagle's tail, another is less visible passing through the left foot of A in STATES. Though a piece has chipped out of the reverse die between OF and AMERICA, creating a misshapen blob visible on all known examples, the dies are in fine condition. A thin die crack extends from beyond the upper point of star 10 to the tops of LIB and the top of the middle flag of E. The reverse is cracked delicately atop UNITED ST, with another crack atop ATES and a finer one atop F of OF. A short crack connects the top right serif of E in AMERICA to the wingtip at right. Some short, halting lapping lines are seen among the denticles above CA, and a long delicate arc of a lapping line touches the foot of R on its way from the denticles to the center of the wing at right. Other areas, including the slight cleft at the eagle's left hip and hollow areas in the upper left wingpit and in the top center of the wing at right, suggest light lapping, though the raised lines that would be the primary evidence are rarely visible on specimens in typical grade.

This is perhaps the most historically important gold coin in the D. Brent Pogue Collection. While the 1854-S half eagle, an extraordinary rarity with just three specimens known, symbolizes the California Gold Rush more than any other coin struck on the West Coast, and the 1795 half eagle (offered in this catalog) wears the laurel of being the first gold coin struck in the United States Mint, no other coin symbolizes the aspirations of the nation and the American economy like the 1795 eagle. It was an ambitious denomination, one whose scale and value suggest the goals of America’s place in global commerce. It was first conceived by Thomas Jefferson, the author of most initial underpinnings of the American coinage system. Then serving as one of Virginia's delegates to Congress, Jefferson described the eagle for the first time in his Notes on the Establishment of a Money Unit and of a Coinage for the United States, popularly known as his "Notes on Coinage," written in the spring of 1784. After explaining why the money unit should be pegged to the familiar Spanish milled dollar and why a decimal-based system is easier for both natives and foreigners, Jefferson suggested "if we adopt the dollar for our unit, we should strike four coins, one of gold, two of silver, and one of copper, viz. 1. a golden piece equal in value to 10 dollars, 2. the unit or dollar itself of silver, 3. the tenth of a dollar, of silver also, 4. the hundredth of a dollar of copper." He further explored his "golden piece" in terms of two coins then common in the cash boxes of American merchants, the first made in mints in Portugal and Brazil, the second a standard English gold coin, noting that the eagle "will be 1/5 more than a half Joe and 1/15 more than a double guinea. It will be readily estimated then by reference to either of them, but more readily and accurately as equal to 10 dollars."

Jefferson did not coin the name "eagle" for his 10 dollar denomination. In May 1785, Jefferson submitted his Propositions Respecting the Coinage of Gold, Silver, and Copper, in which he referred to the largest gold coin of the newly-independent republic as the "crown," an ironic choice that first appears in Gouverneur Morris' 1783 writings regarding a very different coinage scheme. Jefferson wasn’t terribly fond of the title, as he remarked "as to the names above chosen, they, like all other names, are arbitrary, and better may perhaps be substituted." A letter from Jefferson to William Carmichael, dated November 4, 1785, reveals the question of denominations had still not been decided. Virginia delegate James Monroe reported to Jefferson, then in Paris, in January 1786 that "the subject of the mint ... will be taken up again so soon as we have 9 or 10 states (for at present we have but 7)." It took eight more months, but Congress finally came to a resolution on a coinage system on August 8, 1786, declaring that the coin "equal to ten dollars, to be stamped with the impression of the American eagle [would] be called An Eagle."

Not everyone loved the name. Edmund Pendleton, a Virginia planter and politician, wrote to James Madison in December 1786 to complain about the new federal government prerogative to coin money, a power formerly held by the states. He preferred the former system by which the central government merely regulated the value of the coins then circulating, "leaving it to each [state] to coin any bullion they might fortunately meet with at home and in such pieces as their convenience should direct, whether in Eagles or Sparrows, so they conformed to the rules prescribed." Alexander Hamilton, befitting his reputation, was more direct, writing in his 1791 report "On the Establishment of a Mint" that "the eagle is not a very expressive or apt appellation for the largest gold piece, but nothing better occurs." More by inertia than delight, the name remained. So too did the denomination, coined until 1933 but first struck in September 1795.

This coin appears to have survived the adolescence of the American republic far from home, in Germany. It was acquired by T. Harrison Garrett from Ed. Frossard's 1880 sale of the cabinet of George Stenz, a numismatist from Hanover, Germany who "had made large and costly additions to the original stock" of other old-time collections. According to William Strobridge, who went blind soon after composing the enormous first Stenz catalog of 1875 (and, some sources say, because of it), "a large part of it [was] formed by Dr. F. Viewieg, of Berlin, Prussia" while "its foundation was laid from the collections of Baron Welzl von Wellenheim of Vienna; Prince of Pless, Berlin; Baron of Schultheiss Rechberg; and Mr. K. Vander Chijs, Amsterdam." Predictably, the Stenz Collection consisted largely of German coins, but coins of other nations, including the United States, were included. The 1875 Stenz sale included a 1795 half eagle, a 1797 eagle, and 10 other pre-1834 United States gold coins, along with territorial rarities like an 1849 Oregon $5 and an 1849 Mormon $5. The Stenz 1804 quarter dollar, called "quite superior to any heretofore known to exist," brought the stunning sum of $50. The 1880 sale cataloged by Frossard included more rare American coins, including a complete 1843 Proof set that brought $100 and a set of the half dime, dime, and quarter of 1796 that brought $29, $14, and $27, respectively.

The collections that preceded Viewieg and Stenz included some of the most notable ever formed in Europe. That of Leopold Welzl von Wellenheim, sold in 1845 and 1846, has been described by David Fanning as "a remarkable collection, on the whole approaching 50,000 coins and medals." While he gathered American items such as a 1796 dollar, various early American coppers, a Massachusetts Pine Tree shilling, and a Libertas Americana medal, von Wellenheim's cabinet does not appear to have included a 1795 eagle. It remains unknown where the Stenz-Garrett 1795 $10 spent the early 19th century, but the collection of a German nobleman seems like a decided possibility. American coins have long been collected in Germany and Austria, and many remarkable 18th century pieces remain in museums there (including an extremely rare 1794 half dollar struck in copper in the cabinet of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.)

Not knowing who took this coin to Europe, it is tempting to imagine a German doppelganger of William Strickland, the English traveler who visited the United States in 1794 and 1795 and returned to England with the small group of coins that would later become known as the Lord St. Oswald Collection, described earlier in this catalog. No such personality has yet emerged, though enough tantalizing clues exist that some researcher may identify him someday. We likewise don't know exactly who carried the Sarah Sophia Banks specimen of the 1795 eagle off to England, though we do know it was donated to the British Museum soon after her death in 1818. The Banks coin, a Bass Dannreuther-1, is occasionally referred to as the only 1795 eagle that is close in quality to the fabulous Garrett coin, offered here. The Banks example is lovely, though showing a scratch from 6:00 to 8:00 on the reverse that would seemingly leave the Garrett-Pogue coin's place of primacy unchallenged. Aside from their quality, this coin and the Sarah Sophia Banks coin seem to have a similar travel history in common: both were saved when new and taken to Europe as an example of the first large American gold coin. Since reappearing on the American continent, this coin has graced only two collections, the Garrett Collection and that of D. Brent Pogue.

There are a few other high quality 1795 eagles known, but none compare to the Garrett-Pogue specimen, which David Hall has referred to as "the one monster MS-66." Despite claims otherwise, there is no similar coin at Mount Vernon, nor was there one in Washington's well documented estate. The Mint Cabinet 1795 eagle, said to be saved by Adam Eckfeldt though no documentation of that fact exists, appears instead to be a lightly circulated piece that was plucked from a later bullion deposit. In simple terms, this is the most important surviving gold coin struck at the Philadelphia Mint in the 18th century. Most experts would be hard-pressed to identify another contender, even for the sake of conversation. It deserves every one of the untold numbers of breathless encomia heaped upon it since its existence was revealed to modern numismatists at the Garrett sale of 1980. This elegant eagle is a national treasure.